Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1886
Title: FARMERS’ KNOWLEDGE, PERCEPTIONS AND PRACTICES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF FRUIT-INFESTING FLIES (DIPTERA: TEPHRITIDAE) IN NORTHERN GHANA
Authors: Badii, K. B.
Billah, M. K.
Afreh-Nuamah, K.
Obeng-Ofori, D.
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Journal of Ghana Science Association
Series/Report no.: Vol. 16;No. 1
Abstract: Farmer-level training is an important component of fruit fly management in sub-Saharan Africa. Questionnaire survey was conducted among 150 fruit growers in 15 districts in northern Ghana to assess their knowledge, perceptions and practices (KPP) regarding fruit fly pests. Semi-structured questions designed in an open- and closed-ended fashion were used to assess farmers’ KPP about the pests. Even though fruit growers were generally aware that fruit flies cause serious damage to their crops with detrimental consequences on their earnings, many growers demonstrated poor knowledge of the fruit fly pests of economic importance, especially the African invader fly, Bactrocera invadens. Majority of fruit growers were less conversant with the direct damage symptoms of fruit flies on host fruits. Even though common control practices such as farm sanitation and prompt harvesting of fruits were adopted by a few farmers, nearly 40% growers took no action to control the pests. Recommended control strategies such as pheromone trapping, bait application, soil inoculation and the use of natural enemies were virtually unknown or unavailable to the growers, with majority of growers resorting to the application of unprescribed chemicals with potential environmental and health risks. It is important to train fruit growers to acquire basic expertise on fruit fly pests and their management through farmers’ field schools aimed at empowering the most receptive farmers to reach a level of independent decision-making. As farmers adopt multiple efforts to minimize fruit fly infestation in an IPM fashion, there is the need to improve upon these practices so as to enhance their effectiveness in the overall fruit fly suppression programme
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1886
ISSN: 0855-3823
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Agriculture



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