Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1049
Title: ADOPTION OF FARM MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN LOWLAND RICE PRODUCTION IN NORTHERN GHANA
Authors: Donkoh, S. A
Awuni, J. A.
Keywords: Adoption
Farm Management Practices
Kendall’s Coefficient of Concordance
Northern Ghana
Ordered Probit
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: Global Research Journals
Series/Report no.: Vol.2;Issue 6
Abstract: The strategy of the Savannah Accelerated Development Authority (SADA) is ‘based on the concept of a “Forested North” where agricultural production is modernized and oriented towards a larger market embracing the Sahelian countries, including northern Cote d’Ivoire and Togo. The modernization of agricultural production hinges on the adoption of efficient and sustainable farm management practices. The main objectives of the study were to find out: farmers’ perceptions on the most important farm management practices that are relevant in increasing their output or income; and (2) the determinants of the adoption of four soil fertility management practices (improved seed varieties, inorganic fertilizers, dibbling and sowing in rows). The methods of analysis involved a Kendall’s Coefficient of Concordance and the estimation of an Ordered Probit Model for the two objectives respectively. The survey covered seven districts in the Upper East and Northern Regions involving a total of 300 lowland rice farmers. In order of importance, the farmers ranked the following as relevant in increasing their output and income : Timely land preparation; Good seed variety; Soil fertility; Water availability/irrigation; Planting time; Weed control; Harvesting time; Commodity price; and others (such as pests infestation). A Kendall’s coefficient of 51% was recorded, which means that 51% of the respondents agreed on the ranking. The maximum likelihood estimation results of the probit model showed that extension visits, experience and training had a positive influence on the adoption of farm practices, while farm size, landownership and input distance had a negative effect on adoption.farmers’ field school and the extension delivery systems must be improved. More input shops must also be set up close to farmers for easy access to inputs. Also, in as much as large scale farming must be encouraged, this must not be done at the detriment of small-scale farming and the landless. Above all, it is important that whatever support that is given to the farmers must be timely so as to yield the full impact.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1049
ISSN: 1990-6154
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Agriculture

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
ADOPTION OF FARM MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN LOWLAND RICE PRODUCTION IN NORTHERN GHANA.pdf185.8 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in UDSspace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.