Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2452
Title: PROMOTING SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE IN AFRICA THROUGH ECOSYSTEM-BASED FARM MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: EVIDENCE FROM GHANA
Authors: Agula, Caesar
Akudugu, Mamudu Abunga
Dittoh, Saa
Mabe, Franklin Nantui
Keywords: Africa
Agriculture
Ecosystems
Farm management practices
Ghana
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: BioMed Central
Series/Report no.: Vol. 7;Issue 5
Abstract: Background: The type of farming practices employed within an agro-ecosystem have some effects on its health and sustainable agricultural production. Thus, it is important to encourage farmers to make use of ecosystem-friendly farming practices if agricultural production is to be sustainable and this requires the identification of the critical success factors. This paper therefore examined the factors to consider in promoting sustainable agriculture production in Africa through ecosystem-based farm management practices (EBFMPs) using Ghana as a case study. The study employed mixed methods—qualitative and quantitative techniques. Data were collected through key informant interviews, focus group discussions and a semi-structured questionnaire administered to 300 households. The Poisson and negative binomial models were employed to determine the factors that influence farmers’ intensity of adoption of EBFMPs. Eight (8) EBFMPs were used in the paper as the dependent variable, which are organic manure application, conservation of vegetation, conservative tillage, mulching, crop rotation, intercropping with legumes, efficient drainage system and soil bunding. Results: The paper found that the intensity of adoption of EBFMPs is significantly determined by the age of farmers, distance to farms, perception of soil fertility, knowledge of EBFMPs, number of extension visits and the type of irrigation scheme available to farmers. Conclusions: To promote sustainable agricultural production in Ghana and elsewhere in Africa using EBFMBs, these factors must be considered.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2452
ISSN: 2048-7010
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Agribusiness and Communication Sciences



Items in UDSspace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.