Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1731
Title: FRAMEWORK FOR INTEGRATING INDIGENOUS AND FORMAL CONFLICT RESOLUTION APPROACHES IN THE UPPER WEST REGION OF GHANA
Authors: Dangbie, A. D
Issue Date: 2012
Abstract: Notwithstanding the fact that indigenous conflict resolution approaches abound and are used by the people of the Upper West Region (UWIR), formal approaches to conflict resolution often neglect them. The inability of Formal conflict resolution approaches (FCRAs) to sustainably resolve conflicts in the UW IR of Ghana is attributable to the failure to identify a framework that will integrate indigenous conflict resolution approaches (ICRAs) with FCRAs. Specific objectives of the study include: to identify the indigenous techniques in the cultures of the UW IR that can contribute to conflict resolution in the UW IR; to determine the calibre of personality who resolve conflicts in the UW IR; to examine the process of indigenous conflict resolution in the UW IR; to evaluate the determinants of integrating indigenous techniques with formal approaches to conflict resolution; and to interrogate how indigenous and formal conflict resolution approaches can be integrated in the UW IR. The study employed qualitative methods of data collection such as focus group discussions and key informant interviews together with quantitative methods such as closed and open-ended questionnaire. The following conclusions are made: although indigenous approaches to conflict resolution exist and are in widespread usage, they lacked legal grounding; the calibre of personalities who resolve conflicts are regarded trust worthy and are under ritual obligation to live above reproach; that the process of indigenous conflict resolution are perceived to be transparent because disputants understand these processes; the main determinant of successful integration is a critical dialogue between indigenous and formal conflict resolution approaches to enhance the image of indigenous conflict resolution approaches; the study is of the view that the integration of ICRAs and FCRAs lies in the ability to identify points of convergence as basis to resolve issues of power and domination and stereotyping of indigenous approaches. Based on these conclusions the study recommended that: ICRAs should have statutory backing; indigenous leaders and personnel of formal conflict resolution approaches should be trained on the rudiments of both approaches; and that there should be periodic seminars to discuss and address points of convergence and matters of power imbalance and domination.
Description: MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY IN DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1731
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Integrated Development Studies



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