Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2671
Title: ASSESSMENT OF SMALLHOLDER FARMERS' USE OF ECOSYSTEM BASED APPROACHES TO CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION IN WA WEST DISTRICT
Authors: Dong-Uuro, Philemon Puordeme
Issue Date: 2018
Abstract: This study assessed the use of Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EBA) to climate change by smallholder farmers in the Wa West District. Climate change impacts greatly on smallholder farmers due to their dependence on rain-fed agriculture. Ecosystem-based Adaptation proves to be a cost-effective adaptation strategy with the potential to increase farmer resilience to climatic stresses. The study specifically investigated the EbA practices adopted by farmers in the study area. The benefits of EbA were assessed, while the challenges confronting adoption of EbA practices were also investigated. A mixed method study design was adopted for the study. Data were collected using questionnaire, focus group discussions, key informant interviews and observation. The iFormbuilder mobile data application was used for data collection. The findings of the study showed that smallholder farmers in the study area adopt a combination of EbA practices to help them manage the impacts of climate change. Tree planting was found to be the most widely adopted EbA practice, showing a great potential for agroforestry promotion in the District. The study further revealed that, EbA contributes to reducing farmer vulnerability to climatic impacts by increasing soil fertility, increasing crop yields, reducing cost of production and providing windbreaks. However, farmers are faced with the challenges of limited access to appropriate extension information, high labour cost of most EbA practices and longer timescale to realize the adaptation benefits of EbA practices. The study therefore recommended that the District Assembly should include the promotion of trees, such as Cashew and Mango, as cash crops under the Planting for Food and Investment Initiative to take advantage of the existing farmer experience and interest in tree planting as an EbA. It further recommended the establishment of working collaborations between the District Department of Agriculture and NGOs in the District to deliver strategic extension information using mobile extension innovations such as voice messaging and 'Talking Books'. Further research into the cost-benefits analysis of the various EbA practices to determine which are more beneficial to farmers, in the short-term was also recommended.
Description: MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE IN ENVIRONMENT AND RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2671
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Integrated Development Studies



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