Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2670
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dc.contributor.authorOntoyin, J.-
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-02T15:55:08Z-
dc.date.available2020-07-02T15:55:08Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2670-
dc.descriptionMASTER OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE IN DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENTen_US
dc.description.abstractSmall-scale mining (SSM) continues to pose complex environmental, health and livelihood problems among rural folks in mining communities (Hayes, 2008; Kumah, 2006). One of the most subtle impacts of SSM on the environment is its implications on rural livelihoods. However, studies regarding SSM and the environment, sideline their implications on rural livelihoods of residents mining communities and how affected communities cope with such effects. The purpose of this study is to examine the environmental impact of SSM and the implication of such on the rural livelihoods of Yale, Digari and Datuko and the adaptive strategies employed by affected members to cope with SSM. This has become necessary because rural folks are the hardest hit in terms of the negative effects of it. A key reflection on this study demonstrates an interesting linkage among SSM, the environment, rural livelihoods and management. Using a cross-sectional design, data was sampled from 170 key and non-key informants alongside Lantsat imagery interpretation. Three key arguments are advanced in this study. Firstly, the SSM leads to loss of land cover or land degradation, loss of biodiversity and pollution. Most importantly, the study revealed that the loss of land cover is as high as 6.4% in TND compared to the national rate of 5%. The second argument advanced is the fact that SSM is a "necessary evil". This is because the study reveals that the socio-economic cost of SSM exceeds the socio-economic benefits. Again, SSM destroys ., more sustainable natural-based rural livelihoods such as agriculture and also provides and diversifies other non-mining livelihood sources. Hence affected community members tend to adapt strategies to cope with SSM activities. The final argument advanced is the managerial failure of institutions responsible for environmental management and sound SSM practices due to poor collaboration and coordination. The contention of this thesis is that there is the need for effective collaboration of stakeholder both in the local and national level on policy making and implementation on SSM activities and environmental management.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSMALL SCALE MINING AND THE ENVIRONMENT: LIVELIHOODS IMPLICATIONS IN YALE DIGARI AND DATUKUen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Planning and Land Mangement



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