Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2669
Title: INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS AND AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION AMONG FARMERS IN THE SISSALA AREA OF GHANA
Authors: Beyuo, Alfred Naamwintome
Issue Date: 2008
Abstract: Smallholders' knowledge exists and this has sustained their operations since time immemorial. Agricultural development efforts, in terms of technology development and introduction had not been within the reach of the farmer, resulting in the poor adoption rate of borrowed or introduced technologies. This report documents a survey, which entailed the use of questionnaires at individual levels and group discussions, to examine the interplay of indigenous knowledge (1K) and "modernized" technologies in the agricultural extension services and agronomic practices of peasant farmers (majority of who were very active youth and women) in the Sissala area of Ghana. The study revealed extensive 1K in both crop and animal production among the farmers, widespread extension support by the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) in the area and great potential for blending the two for poverty reduction among farmers. It however found that MOFA has not been able to tap on this potential, resulting in gaps in its extension services to farmers in the area. Indigenous knowledge systems exist in Sissala among farmers and this has been amply demonstrated by farmers from this study. Modern agricultural extension is prevalent in the Sissala districts and its existence has been demonstrated by the introduction of technologies. These introduced technologies are poorly adopted; those that are adopted are completely transformed to suit the farmer's local conditions. Even though farmers acknowledge the benefits thereof in working with agricultural extension agents and desire working with them, this is not reflected in 100% adoption of introduced technologies, Consequently, recommendations are made fo'r the integration of efforts (that of the farmer and the agricultural officer) in the area of extension development and delivery methods. This will ensure that efforts are grounded in the indigenous knowledge of the farmer. This synergy building will recognize or reflect the potential of the smallholder. In involving him/her in the knowledge generation and exchange, adoption could be enhanced and thus increased productivity of the farmer
Description: MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY IN DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2669
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Integrated Development Studies



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