Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2036
Title: ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECT OF CARBONIZED AND UNCARBONIZED COMPOST BASED AMENDMENTS ON SOIL PROPERTIES, NUTRIENT UPTAKE AND YIELD OF FRESH MAIZE
Authors: Ayamwego, James
Issue Date: 2018
Abstract: A field experiment was conducted in 2015 at Gumbihini, an open space market gardening site in Tamale Ghana. The objective of the study was to determine the effects of carbonized and uncarbonized compost based soil amendments on changes in soil properties, nutrient uptake, growth and yield of fresh maize. Six compost treatments were made with poultry manure (15%vol), rice straw (60%vol) and either amended with carbonized rice husk compost, carbonized corn cob compost and carbonized wood or their uncarbonized feedstock. This then gave six treatments and consisted of uncarbonized rice husk compost (R0), uncarbonized corn cobs compost (M0), uncarbonized sawdust compost (S0), carbonized rice husk compost (R1), carbonized corn cobs compost (M1) and carbonized wood compost (S1). The experiment also included two other conventional composts which were sawdust multi-grow compost (G1) and rice husk multi-grow (G2) with two other controls (NAP and CO). Treatments were arranged in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replications. Data was collected on growth parameters, above ground biomass, soil properties, nutrient uptake and mass loss of compost in litterbags. The experimental results showed significant differences (P > 0.05) in stem girth, fresh yield (Stover), dry biomass. The results also showed that both carbonized and uncarbonized compost application significantly increased soil pH and increased the levels of C, N, and P in the topsoil. There was significant difference in mass loss of the composts after three months and one year of incorporation of the litter bags in soil. Further knowledge should be obtained about the long-term effects of compost on soil properties and plant performance
Description: MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY HORTICULTURE
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2036
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Agriculture



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