Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2021
Title: EFFECTS OF ETHNIC CONFLICTS ON LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION: A CASE STUDY OF THE BAWKU MUNICIPALITY OF THE UPPER EAST REGION
Authors: BARIYAM, TAMILKA SERAPHINE
Issue Date: 2018
Abstract: The perennial conflicts in Northern Ghana have affected economic activities and the animal production industry. This study investigated the effects of ethnic conflicts on livestock production in the Bawku Municipality. Semi-structured questionnaire were used to interview respondents. Data was collected on the effects of ethnic conflicts on livestock farmers, butchers, food vendors, livestock traders, veterinary officers and key informant in the Bawku Municipality. The data gathered was analysed using PROC FREQ procedure of SAS. Livestock production data was analysed using PROC FREQ whereas prices and incomes of respondents were analysed by the MIXED LINEAR MODULE procedure of SAS for PROC FREQ. Differences were tested by the Chi square test of proportions. Ethnic conflicts in Bawku is usually triggered by the celebration of the “Samanpiid” festival and then fueled by political party politics. The severest ethnic conflict occurred in the 2000-2001 and this period was used as the reference period for this study. Common livestock produced in the area included: cattle, sheep, goats, poultry and pigs. Commonest housing systems for livestock were the extensive system (82%) with only 14% and 4% practicing the intensive and semi-intensive system of management, respectively. The average number of cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and poultry before the conflict were 5, 9, 11, 1 and 10 respectively and the numbers after the conflict were 1,3,4,5 and 0, respectively. The corresponding percentage reduction/increase was 80%, 66.7%, 63.6%, 400%, and 100% respectively. The losses were attributed to starvation (2%), poisoning (2%), indiscriminate killing (13%) and stealing (83%). The prices of livestock differed greatly (<.0001) before and after the conflict. The market prices of cattle, sheep and goats before the conflict were GHS 1222.00, GHS 293.20 and GHS 562.40, respectively but these increased to GHS 3040.00, GHS 658.00 and GHS 1184.00 respectively, after the conflict. The higher price of the animals after the conflict was attributed to the reduction in animal numbers. This resulted in a reduction/increase (<.0001) in the income levels of respondents after the conflict from GHS 3046.64 to GHS 611.04 (livestock farmers), GHS 3000 to GHS 3500 (livestock traders), GHS 3000 to GHS 2428.85 (Food vendors), GHS 3000 to GHS 2000 (Butchers), GHS 3000 to GHS 2000 (Veterinary officers), respectively. The conflict also affected the activities of livestock traders. Generally, livestock production was adversely affected because volume of production and levels of incomes generated from livestock production decreased due to the excesses of the conflicts. The livestock management systems in Ghana are basically subsistent and therefore the industry suffers most during conflicts. Policies on alternative dispute resolution should be implemented to curb the rampant ethnic conflicts in the area.
Description: MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY IN ANIMAL SCIENCE
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2021
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Agriculture



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